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ACADEMICALLY UNDER-PREPARED AFRICAN AMERICAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENTS’ PERCEPTIONS OF SUPPORTS FOR AND BARRIERS TO PROGRAM COMPLETION

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dc.contributor.author Harrell II, John R.
dc.date.accessioned 2019-07-24T17:49:21Z
dc.date.available 2019-07-24T17:49:21Z
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12262/201
dc.description.abstract John H., Academically under-prepared African American community college students’ perceptions of supports for and barriers to program completion. Doctor of Education (Executive Educational Leadership), May, 2019, Houston Baptist University, Houston, Texas. Purpose The purpose of this study is to describe the perceptions of academically under-prepared African American community college students regarding supports for and barriers to program completion. For the purpose of this study, program completion will be defined as satisfying all the academic requirements needed to attain a certificate, degree, or credits required for transfer to a four-year institution within two years. The institution that is the focus of this study has programs in place for student success. However, the effectiveness of these programs has not been evaluated through students’ feedback. Methodology In this mixed-method study, I utilized elements of phenomenological research. In addition, frequencies and percentages were used to address Likert-scaled items on the questionnaire that was used in this study. Findings The findings of research questions one and two indicated that at Houston Community College’s Central Campus academically under-prepared students of any race identified similar supports for and barriers to on-time program completion. The primary supports for on-time community college program completion identified by the students included engaged faculty and robust, holistic wrap-around services. Conversely, the primary barriers to on-time community college program completion identified by the students included financial burden, complex processes, and disengaged staff. Additionally, students identified time management and faculty with little pedagogical knowledge as barriers to on-time program completion. Conclusions The economics and demographic make-up of the state continue to shift, but the primary mission for community colleges remains consistent and remains important. Community College ultimately exists to meet the diverse needs of students as they work towards attaining a post-secondary credential. As our country continues to become more diverse and more minority students enter the doors of our nation’s community colleges in hopes of attaining a credential that supports their professional growth, it becomes vital that we work to remove the barriers that lime access, persistence, and attainment. KEY WORDS: African American students, Community College, Student persistence, Enrollment intensity, Graduation rates
dc.title ACADEMICALLY UNDER-PREPARED AFRICAN AMERICAN COMMUNITY COLLEGE STUDENTS’ PERCEPTIONS OF SUPPORTS FOR AND BARRIERS TO PROGRAM COMPLETION
dc.date.updated 2019-07-20T10:01:05Z
dc.language.rfc3066 en


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